Joshua Nasielski | Graduate & Postdoctoral Studies

Joshua Nasielski

Portrait of professor Joshua Nasielski

Summary: 

How can Ontario farmers make more money, be more environmentally sustainable, and be more resilient to climate extremes?​

Program

Plant Agriculture

About my research

I conduct agronomic research of direct relevance to the farmers of northern and eastern Ontario, while making scientific contributions of wider geographic scope by uncovering the physiological mechanisms which underpin cropping systems. Generally, my research investigates the agronomy and crop physiology of field crops commonly grown in northern Ontario (small grain cereals, corn and soybeans). Unique to this research program is a built-in collaboration with the scientific staff and facilities located at the Winchester, New Liskeard and Emo agricultural research stations.

How my research can improve life

How can Ontario farmers make more money, be more environmentally sustainable, and be more resilient to climate extremes? The sciences of agronomy and crop physiology can provide answers to this multi-faceted question. During the growing season, on-farm decisions are dictated in part by crop ecophysiological responses (e.g. planting density and row width, seeding depth, to name a few decision). My research tries to help farmers make better on-farm decisions via improved understanding of agronomic and crop physiological response to management.

Why chose grad studies at U of G?

Guelph has few rivals in terms of the critical mass of infrastructure (e.g. lab and field instruments), expertise (other U of Guelph faculty, strong connections to the agriculture industry) and fellow graduate students focused on agriculture. Guelph is a wonderful place to live, and the campus is a friendly and welcoming place. If you want a graduate education that will provide a strong theoretical and applied understanding of agriculture, then my graduate program is potentially of interest.