Brittany Luby | Graduate & Postdoctoral Studies

Brittany Luby

Portrait of Brittany Luby

Email: 
brittany.luby@uoguelph.ca
Summary: 

I am particularly interested in the effects of post-war development on Anishinaabe food systems and family well being.​

Programs

History
Collaborative Specialization in One Health

About My Research...

I am building my career at the intersection of Indigenous and family histories in the region covered by Treaty 3 (northwestern Ontario and southwestern Manitoba). I am particularly interested in the effects of post-war development on Anishinaabe food systems and family well being. Conducting research at this crossing point allows me to work in archives, interview with Elders, as well as practice traditional food harvesting and processing techniques.

How My Research Improves Life...

My historical research is future-focused. Elders maintain that manomin (wild rice) yields decreased exponentially in Treaty 3 after 1945 due to settler-imposed changes within the Winnipeg River Drainage Basin. Dr. Andrea Bradford from the School of Engineering and I have partnered to determine whether traditional Anishinaabe foods like can be revitalized along the Winnipeg River. I manage qualitative research activities that may help us to understand when loss occurred (and its perceived causes) as well as historic conditions associated with successful crop yields. We are working to increase food security, economic opportunity, and to strengthen cultural practice in Treaty 3.

Why chose this program and grad studies at U of G?

The Tri-University Program has a strong roster of Indigenous scholars (and scholars of Indigenous history)to train with. Dr. Kim Anderson, Dr. Lianne Leddy, Dr. Susan Neylan, Dr. Susan Roy, and myself all have active research programs and are invested in training others to question Canada's colonial history and its living legacies. If you are interested in social justice, know that UoG has a scholarly network that can support you and your research.